“Joe Keatinge has established himself as the latest new writer I want to undermine and destroy. It’s just top class stuff.”
- Mark Millar (Kick-Ass, Civil War, Wanted, Ultimates)

"I think Joe is definitely one to watch."
- Robert Kirkman (Walking Dead, Invincible)

e-mail: joe@keatinge.com
Reblogged from fetorpse  26 notes

benito-cereno:

As part of the continued celebration of the tenth anniversary of Tales from the Bully Pulpit, here is a thing you may not have seen before.

This was the backup story in Invincible #14 that was used to promote the book. Art here is by Nate fetorpse Bellegarde, with whom I did all the Invincible backups and most of the comics I made for a long time. Some of the stuff here is a callback to previous backups, most notably the “jacket on/jacket off” joke (though “jacket off” should still be funny to basically anyone). Also, sweet bonus appearance by bclaymoore

The little-seen Tales from the Bully Pulpit animation that Graeme MacDonald (artist on the actual book) did for his student reel was loosely based on the six panel adventure presented here.

BONUS FACT: Robert Kirkman did not think anyone would get the joke about Dan Brown because he didn’t know who that was. Maybe he’s right, I dunno.

Man, I really loved this one-shot. I wish we had ten years of monthly comics after it. 

Reblogged from wellnotwisely  34 notes

wellnotwisely:

Wrote a thing about Geof Darrow, and Big Guy and Rusty- old and new. You can read it full here.

'Miller and Darrow’s original Big Guy and Rusty series saw Japan attacked by the incarnation of ultimate evil, manifest as a vast dinosaur/dragon creature, infecting the populace with chaos and fear, causing them to mutate into beasts as it rampaged, whilst delivering typical Miller-esqe bombastic polemic.

The ‘American might and superiority over Japanese ineffectual ditheriness’ concept, the names (‘Rusty:’ weak, incapable, ‘Big Guy:’ reliable, powerful, gets the job done), and the portrayals do not read well, and are so obvious, so embarrassingly shaky and superficial a thing, that there are those who’d argue the comic was satire (you know how that works?). If it sounds light on premise and intricacy, that’s because it is — robot clocks monsters, suspect ideology, with some nods to toy/kaiju/ mech culture thrown in; it’s saving grace, the reason you were there and stayed, was Darrow’s art: fine-lined, tight and knotty, beautiful detail bestowed in every nook and cranny.’

Reblogged from comicsalliance  48 notes
comicsalliance:

HUMANOIDS TO RELEASE NEW EDITION OF ‘BARBARELLA’ ADAPTED BY KELLY SUE DECONNICK
By Matt D. Wilson
Though hugely influential on characters including Vampirella, Jean-Claude Forest‘s Barbarella graphic novels haven’t really made a huge dent in American comics culture. Many fans are likely familiar with the 1968 movie starring Jane Fonda, but Forest’s French comics haven’t been printed in English since appearing in Heavy Metal back in 1978.
That’s about to change thanks to Humanoids Publishing and writer Kelly Sue DeConnick. A new translation of Forest’s Barbarella, scripted by DeConnick, is set for release September 24, with the first-ever English reprint of the second book, The Wrath of the Minute-Eater, coming in January.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

HUMANOIDS TO RELEASE NEW EDITION OF ‘BARBARELLA’ ADAPTED BY KELLY SUE DECONNICK

By Matt D. Wilson

Though hugely influential on characters including Vampirella, Jean-Claude Forest‘s Barbarella graphic novels haven’t really made a huge dent in American comics culture. Many fans are likely familiar with the 1968 movie starring Jane Fonda, but Forest’s French comics haven’t been printed in English since appearing in Heavy Metal back in 1978.

That’s about to change thanks to Humanoids Publishing and writer Kelly Sue DeConnick. A new translation of Forest’s Barbarella, scripted by DeConnick, is set for release September 24, with the first-ever English reprint of the second book, The Wrath of the Minute-Eater, coming in January.

READ MORE