“Joe Keatinge has established himself as the latest new writer I want to undermine and destroy. It’s just top class stuff.”
- Mark Millar (Kick-Ass, Civil War, Wanted, Ultimates)

"I think Joe is definitely one to watch."
- Robert Kirkman (Walking Dead, Invincible)

Reblogged from royalboiler  63 notes
how much time did you spend working on the central core concept of 8house before presenting it the rest of the already announced collaborators?
Anonymous

royalboiler:

 I think initially I started writing a thing with my pal Marley Zarcone. called Nona. The idea was to do something that felt like what we wanted Vertigo books to be like— dark magic and fashionable ladies. 

There were all these houses of magic in that story with the main character Nona being a magic user who escaped from her coven cutting runes into shadows. 

and at the same time there was talk about an Image relaunch of Top cow in the same way we reworked the Extreme stuff. I was talking about doing my version of Pitt ( I wanted Mike Vega to draw it and I was talking to Sarah Horrocks about co-writing) and Marian was going to do an old lady witch version of Witchblade. Joe Keatinge was gonna do Cyberforce and we wanted Adam Warren on it too. (I don’t remember on what book)

Anyway, none of those things came to be but in some way through talking to Image they turned into 8house. (I’m still hoping the Nona book happens but Muggles has some other new exciting work on the way) 

I talk to Emma Rios a lot (we are manga blood bruthers)and the idea of bringing her onto anything I’m involved with in an exciting one.—she brought in Hwei (whose work I think is amazing)

Sloane is an artists whose work I’ve admired for years so I introduced her to Marian, and Claire is an old friend whose writing has impressed me for years. (I’ve been hoping she would do an Image book for a long time)

I met Xurxo through finding his art on Deviantart and being amazed by it.The idea for 8house Kiem was something that I think started as Simon Roy’s ideas. 

 Fil is a comic book hero of mine whose work I first read when I was 10— and bringing him into anything I’m involved with is a little too exciting. 

but in answer to the question. I tend to jump into things when they’re still a mess. I don’t know if this is an ideal way to work but it seems to be the way I do. like in Prophet I had no plans for multiple artists until we were into it. That is one of the joys I think of ongoing comics. It feels like a version of how Moebius did his Airtight garage— well a little more planning than that— but still just hoping that it all works out in the end. 

 and here’s a Marley Nona page—

image

secrets revealed!!

Reblogged from jordiecolorsthings  104 notes

jordiecolorsthings:

kurtbusiek:

panelsonpages:

Kurt Busiek is on his way to Image with something that sounds nuts.

Press info below:

++++++++++++++

IMAGE EXPO ANNOUNCEMENT: TOOTH AND CLAW is Conan meets Game of Thrones meets Kamandi

An all-new ongoing epic fantasy series from Kurt Busiek & Ben Dewey

Bestselling writer Kurt Busiek (MARVELS and ASTRO CITY) returns to Image Comics with rising-star artist Ben Dewey (I Was the Cat, The Tragedy Series), colorist Jordie Bellaire (THE MANHATTAN PROJECTS, PRETTY DEADLY), and John Roshell of Comicraft for an all-new ongoing series that is Conan meets Game of Thrones meets Kamandi in an original high-fantasy epic for mature readers in TOOTH AND CLAW this November.

In TOOTH AND CLAW, a secret conclave of wizards brings a legendary champion forward through time from the forgotten past to save the world, with disastrous consequences. Swords, sorcery, beast-wizards, gods, sprawling animal empires, golems of radioactive decay, crystalline badlands, con women, ancient armories, young love, mystery, blood and death and treachery and destiny… TOOTH AND CLAW is an epic story you won’t want to miss out on.

“This is a series I’ve wanted to do for more than a decade,” said Busiek. “I’ve been slowly building the world, figuring out its secrets, and waiting for the ideal chance to bring it to life. It’s as complex and sweeping a world as Astro City, though in very, very different ways, and as brutal and visceral as anything I managed to do on Conan.

“And without having any idea I was doing this, it turned out I was designing the perfect series for Ben Dewey to draw. Everything I’ve asked him to draw, from airborne wicker cities to crusty warthog wizardesses to stolid bison-tribesmen and tricky coyote traders, he makes it look perfect. Lush, involving, richly textured and utterly convincing, the world Ben brings to life is everything I imagined and then some. I couldn’t be happier to be working with him on this—he draws a world that feels like you could just step into it, walk down a lane and around a corner, and find a million new adventures, characters as rich and compelling as anyone in the foreground.

"I’m also thrilled that we’re working with the great Jordie Bellaire, who’s transforming Ben’s black-and-white line-and tone-work to life with vivid, Renaissance-painting color, and John Roshell and the gang at Comicraft, who perform miracles monthly, and even when I ask for something utterly contradictory, like ‘I want it to be lettered like a classic 1940s comic strip and feel distinctively modern,’ just shrug and make it happen as if it’s the easiest thing in the world.

"And of course, we’re at Image, so the book is exactly what we want it to be, exactly the way we want it to look.”

“I can tell you, without caveats, that there is no project more custom fit to my sensibilities that this one; everything I’ve ever wanted to draw, invent and explore has come my way by working on this book with Kurt,” added Dewey. “I worked hard to infuse each page with my excitement and enthusiasm for the world that is being built as we progress. I hope to cultivate an audience that’s as thrilled to read it as I have been during the process of creating this story.”

“Years ago, when I first became Publisher here at Image, I made a list of writers and artists I wanted to work with, and Kurt Busiek was one of the names at the top,” said Eric Stephenson, Publisher at Image Comics. “Kurt and I have had a number of near-misses over the years: When I was editing comics for Rob Liefeld at Extreme Studios, Kurt almost wrote Supreme, and later, he was slated to do Youngblood: Year One, but didn’t, so it’s really cool that we’re finally bringing something to fruition together after so long. What’s even cooler, though, is that Kurt’s found such an unbelievably talented collaborator in Ben Dewey. As anyone familiar with the award-winning series Marvels and Astro City knows, Kurt’s no stranger to awesome artists, and even though he’s relatively new to the game, Ben is every bit as amazing as Kurt’s past creative partners. Everything about this series is absolutely magnificent, and I can’t wait for its debut this November.”

The action begins in November 2014 with a spectacular DOUBLE-SIZED FIRST ISSUE, featuring forty-four pages of story with no ads for the regular price of just $2.99.

I was going to put up a preview, but hey! These fine folks did the work for me…

I’m coloring this beast of beasts!

Reblogged from leiladelduca  23 notes
leiladelduca:

Hey everyone! I know you’re all busy with SDCC, but I want to point out that in Everywhere Else Land, this comic book I’ve been drawing for years with writer Erik Taylor is finally available on Comixology through Action Lab. It’ll see print later this year, but if you prefer reading digital, here’s the link to the first part. 
Also, here’s a great review over at Coming Up Comics. “The Pantheon Project marks the debut for writer Erik F. Taylor and he comes out swinging. A creative story in which he makes you care about these characters immediately.”
It’s really interesting to see my work on THE PANTHEON PROJECT since these first pages you’ll see were drawn years before my work on SHUTTER. And by the time I’m finished drawing the last of THE PANTHEON PROJECT, SHUTTER #6 will be out on the shelves. Maybe not interesting…but kind of interesting. Okay, what are we doing, let’s get back to reading updates about SDCC!

leiladelduca:

Hey everyone! I know you’re all busy with SDCC, but I want to point out that in Everywhere Else Land, this comic book I’ve been drawing for years with writer Erik Taylor is finally available on Comixology through Action Lab. It’ll see print later this year, but if you prefer reading digital, here’s the link to the first part. 

Also, here’s a great review over at Coming Up Comics.The Pantheon Project marks the debut for writer Erik F. Taylor and he comes out swinging. A creative story in which he makes you care about these characters immediately.”

It’s really interesting to see my work on THE PANTHEON PROJECT since these first pages you’ll see were drawn years before my work on SHUTTER. And by the time I’m finished drawing the last of THE PANTHEON PROJECT, SHUTTER #6 will be out on the shelves. Maybe not interesting…but kind of interesting. Okay, what are we doing, let’s get back to reading updates about SDCC!

Reblogged from iamdavidbrothers  56 notes
iamdavidbrothers:

graemem:

chadnevett:

twiststreet:

comicsalliance:

DARK HORSE PUSHES 12 CREATOR-OWNED SERIES FOR SDCC, INCLUDING ‘FIGHT CLUB 2′, ‘LADY KILLER’, AND ‘HELLBOY AND THE B.P.R.D.’
By Andrew Wheeler
Over the last twelve days, Dark Horse has thrown a spotlight on twelve new creator-owned titles that they plan to promote at this year’s San Diego Comic-Con. The series include the Fight Club sequel from Chuck Palahniuk and Cameron Stewart
READ MORE

How much of the Fight Club sequel is Cameron Stewart going to own?  

How many of the creative personnel on a comic have to own a piece for it to be considered creator-owned?
Coming soon to a comics discussion near you: “Semi-creator-owned.”

Weirdly enough, I was thinking of this yesterday in terms of Image. For all intents and purposes, is Supreme: Blue Rose considered a creator-owned comic or a work-for-hire gig? Rob Liefeld owns Supreme, sure, but for Warren Ellis and Tula Lotay, what’s the difference between working on that book versus working on something for Marvel and DC? Is Prophet creator-owned or work-for-hire, in that Brandon Graham and his artists own none of it, but the guy who created the original character owns the whole thing?
Which “creators” are we talking about when it comes to defining “creator-owned,” is what I’m asking, I guess?

I think it’s a mix of both. Prophet is a work-for-hire project on a creator-owned book. The original creator owns the property, but hires people to work on it. Both are true, but not mutually exclusive. It’s more of a line with several points (full creator-owned and fully work-for-hire for a corporation are on opposite ends, I think, “creator participation” toward the corp side, wfh on c-o toward the full c-o side) than two opposites. I’ve been thinking about this a lot but haven’t quite managed to figure out how I feel yet.

As a guy hired out to do another book in the same line of books as Prophet (Glory now available in a hardcoveifbgblahblahblah) I do not get where the confusion comes from here.
Rob Liefeld created a character called Glory. Rob Liefeld, owner of Glory, hires Ross Campbell and me to do something new with his character and compensates us very fairly to do so. It’s a creator owned work because the person who created the character owns it. Ross and I may have taken Glory in a very different direction than it went before, but the core of it is still the character Rob created. We went in fully understanding he would own whatever we add to his initial creation. I have no qualms about it. Rob was/is a very fair employer. 
Whereas on Shutter Leila and I own everything so look for Shutter Presents Alarm Cat by Rob Liefeld coming April 2015, copyright Leila del Duca and Joe Keatinge.

iamdavidbrothers:

graemem:

chadnevett:

twiststreet:

comicsalliance:

DARK HORSE PUSHES 12 CREATOR-OWNED SERIES FOR SDCC, INCLUDING ‘FIGHT CLUB 2′, ‘LADY KILLER’, AND ‘HELLBOY AND THE B.P.R.D.’

By Andrew Wheeler

Over the last twelve days, Dark Horse has thrown a spotlight on twelve new creator-owned titles that they plan to promote at this year’s San Diego Comic-Con. The series include the Fight Club sequel from Chuck Palahniuk and Cameron Stewart

READ MORE

How much of the Fight Club sequel is Cameron Stewart going to own?  

How many of the creative personnel on a comic have to own a piece for it to be considered creator-owned?

Coming soon to a comics discussion near you: “Semi-creator-owned.”

Weirdly enough, I was thinking of this yesterday in terms of Image. For all intents and purposes, is Supreme: Blue Rose considered a creator-owned comic or a work-for-hire gig? Rob Liefeld owns Supreme, sure, but for Warren Ellis and Tula Lotay, what’s the difference between working on that book versus working on something for Marvel and DC? Is Prophet creator-owned or work-for-hire, in that Brandon Graham and his artists own none of it, but the guy who created the original character owns the whole thing?

Which “creators” are we talking about when it comes to defining “creator-owned,” is what I’m asking, I guess?

I think it’s a mix of both. Prophet is a work-for-hire project on a creator-owned book. The original creator owns the property, but hires people to work on it. Both are true, but not mutually exclusive. It’s more of a line with several points (full creator-owned and fully work-for-hire for a corporation are on opposite ends, I think, “creator participation” toward the corp side, wfh on c-o toward the full c-o side) than two opposites. I’ve been thinking about this a lot but haven’t quite managed to figure out how I feel yet.

As a guy hired out to do another book in the same line of books as Prophet (Glory now available in a hardcoveifbgblahblahblah) I do not get where the confusion comes from here.

Rob Liefeld created a character called Glory. Rob Liefeld, owner of Glory, hires Ross Campbell and me to do something new with his character and compensates us very fairly to do so. It’s a creator owned work because the person who created the character owns it. Ross and I may have taken Glory in a very different direction than it went before, but the core of it is still the character Rob created. We went in fully understanding he would own whatever we add to his initial creation. I have no qualms about it. Rob was/is a very fair employer.

Whereas on Shutter Leila and I own everything so look for Shutter Presents Alarm Cat by Rob Liefeld coming April 2015, copyright Leila del Duca and Joe Keatinge.